Cranes and Overhead Electrical Lines

Safety measures for working around overhead power lines are covered in OSHA’s regulation 1910.333(c)(3). If work is to be performed near overhead lines, the line must be deenergized and grounded, or other protective measures must be implemented before work is started. If protective measures are provided, such as guarding, isolating, or insulating, these precautions must prevent ... [Continue Reading]

Job Hazard Analysis for Worksite Safety

OSHA recently issued notices of safety violations to a U.S. Army Reserve base after a federal civilian employee was fatally injured when the automated lifting mechanism of a utility vehicle cargo box failed and pinned him between the bed and the vehicle frame. OSHA investigators determined that there was not an adequate hazardous energy control program in place and failed to ... [Continue Reading]

Machinery Guarding for Worker Safety

The operation of machinery and equipment can be extremely dangerous. Injuries involving machinery and equipment often result in permanent disability. OSHA’s more than 40-year inspection experience indicates that employee exposures to unguarded or inadequately guarded machinery and equipment, together with associated hazardous energy, occur in many worksites. OSHA recently ... [Continue Reading]

New Updates for Cranes and Derricks

OSHA is updating the agency's standard for cranes and derricks in construction by clarifying each employer's duty to ensure the competency of crane operators through training, certification or licensing, and evaluation. OSHA is also altering a provision that required different levels of certification based on the rated lifting capacity of equipment. While testing organizations ... [Continue Reading]

Overhead Line Work and Safety Measures

Overhead line work requirements are contained in OSHA’s regulation 1910.269(q). Key provisions include: ▪    Poles and towers must be structurally capable of withstanding the stresses that may be imposed when installing and removing equipment. If necessary, structures may be braced to ensure that they can withstand the anticipated load. ▪    Before anyone climbs a pole, ... [Continue Reading]

The Dangers of Mold and How to Avoid

Molds are microscopic organisms found everywhere in the environment, indoors and outdoors. Most molds are harmless but some can cause infections, allergy symptoms and produce toxins. Inhalation is the exposure of most concern to cleanup workers. Health Effects of Mold Exposure Runny nose • Eye irritation • Cough/congestion • Sneezing • Skin rash • Aggravation of ... [Continue Reading]

The ABCs of Safety Certification

Construction managers are well aware of the necessity for employees to complete OSHA certified 10-hour and 30-hour training courses, both for high-end projects and those less complicated. However, it is worth emphazing the benefits of making sure that workers are qualified with not only the proper training—but also with the necessary completion card. Here we break down the ... [Continue Reading]

Eye Protection: Sunglasses Don’t Count

OSHA's eye and face protection standard, 29 CFR 1910.133, requires the use of eye and face protection when workers are exposed to hazards such as flying objects, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation. Importantly, eyeglasses designed for ordinary wear do not provide the level of protection ... [Continue Reading]

Safety Protocol for Hazardous Chemicals

When it comes to hazardous chemicals in the workplace, OSHA is very clear on the proper protocol for the labeling, handling and training required to work with these substances. OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS), 29 CFR 1910.1200, requires employers to implement a hazard communication program. The program must include labels on containers of hazardous chemicals, safety ... [Continue Reading]

Safety Training for Temporary Workers

Hiring temporary workers for special projects or seasonal work is a common practice in the construction industry, but it does not exempt the employer from the responsibility of safety training equal to that of permanent employees. In the case of hiring workers through a temporary agency, OSHA could hold both the host and temporary employers responsible for dangerous ... [Continue Reading]