Hazard Communication: What You Need to Know

The Hazard Communication Standard, first established by OSHA in the 1980s, establishes requirements to make sure that the hazards of all chemicals imported into or used in U.S. workplaces are evaluated, and that this hazard information is transmitted to exposed employees. The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) is now aligned with the Globally Harmonized System of ... [Continue Reading]

OSHA Releases Top 10 Safety Violations for 2018

At the National Safety Council’s 2018 Congress & Expo in Houston last October, OSHA released its most frequently cited workplace safety violations for 2018. Not surprisingly, fall protection continues to top the list, but notably, Eye and Face Protection replaced Electrical (Wiring Methods) for the number 10 spot. The list underscores the necessity for appropriate ... [Continue Reading]

General Contractors Increasingly Liable for Subcontractors

A recent decision in the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans has ruled that general contractors can be held responsible for subcontractors that create OSHA violations. With the potential to have wide-sweeping repercussions in the construction industry, the ruling was brought about by safety violations from a subcontracting team to build a new library for the City of ... [Continue Reading]

Workplace Fatalities Decline in 2017

There was a small but not insignificant decline in workplace fatalism over the past year, underscoring the importance of safety precautions and compliance. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 43 fewer workplace fatalities in 2017 than the previous year. The fatal injury rate also decreased from 3.6 percent in 2016 to 3.5 percent in 2017. For the ... [Continue Reading]

The ABCs of PPE

Personal protective equipment is a fundamental part of protecting construction workers from serious workplace injuries that may result from contact with chemical, radiological, physical, electrical or mechanical hazards. Personal protective equipment may include items such as gloves, safety glasses and shoes, earplugs or muffs, hard hats, respirators, or coveralls, vests and ... [Continue Reading]

Cranes and Overhead Electrical Lines

Safety measures for working around overhead power lines are covered in OSHA’s regulation 1910.333(c)(3). If work is to be performed near overhead lines, the line must be deenergized and grounded, or other protective measures must be implemented before work is started. If protective measures are provided, such as guarding, isolating, or insulating, these precautions must prevent ... [Continue Reading]

Job Hazard Analysis for Worksite Safety

OSHA recently issued notices of safety violations to a U.S. Army Reserve base after a federal civilian employee was fatally injured when the automated lifting mechanism of a utility vehicle cargo box failed and pinned him between the bed and the vehicle frame. OSHA investigators determined that there was not an adequate hazardous energy control program in place and failed to ... [Continue Reading]

Machinery Guarding for Worker Safety

The operation of machinery and equipment can be extremely dangerous. Injuries involving machinery and equipment often result in permanent disability. OSHA’s more than 40-year inspection experience indicates that employee exposures to unguarded or inadequately guarded machinery and equipment, together with associated hazardous energy, occur in many worksites. OSHA recently ... [Continue Reading]

New Updates for Cranes and Derricks

OSHA is updating the agency's standard for cranes and derricks in construction by clarifying each employer's duty to ensure the competency of crane operators through training, certification or licensing, and evaluation. OSHA is also altering a provision that required different levels of certification based on the rated lifting capacity of equipment. While testing organizations ... [Continue Reading]

Overhead Line Work and Safety Measures

Overhead line work requirements are contained in OSHA’s regulation 1910.269(q). Key provisions include: ▪    Poles and towers must be structurally capable of withstanding the stresses that may be imposed when installing and removing equipment. If necessary, structures may be braced to ensure that they can withstand the anticipated load. ▪    Before anyone climbs a pole, ... [Continue Reading]